Peterborough’s ‘Ramadan Man’ to climb Britain’s highest mountain for charity - while fasting for 20 hours

Peterborough man - known as the ‘Ramadan Man’ - is climbing Ben Nevis next month to raise money to build an orphanage in Indonesia.

By Adam Barker
Wednesday, 23rd March 2022, 9:16 am
Tariq will take on the highest mountain in Great Britain in his newest fundraising quest (image: Getty)
Tariq will take on the highest mountain in Great Britain in his newest fundraising quest (image: Getty)

Tariq Mahmood, from Bretton, is climbing Britain’s highest mountain during Ramadan next month.

If that wasn't hard enough, he's completing the climb during a period of fasting - to raise vital funds to build an orphanage for children in Indonesia.

Mr Mahmood, who is known as the ‘Ramadan Man’, will climb Scotland's Ben Nevis on 23 April this year, which will take him 1,345 metres above sea-level.

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Tariq Mahmood, known as the ‘Ramadan Man’, will climb Ben Nevis in Scotland on 23 April this year during Ramadan to raise money for charity.

His climb will take place during Ramadan (2 April - 1 May) - the ninth month of the Islamic calendar observed by Muslims worldwide as a month of fasting, prayer, reflection and community.

“I will complete the climb under the rules of Ramadan and fasting,” Mr Mahmood said.

“I will have been fasting for 12 or 13 hours before I even take on the challenge.

“I’m training for it already because you need to condition your body for these types of challenges.”

In 2019, Mr Mahmood became the first person to run a marathon while fasting for Ramadan - raising £50,000 to build houses in Indonesia.

In 2019, Mr Mahmood became the first person to run a marathon while fasting for Ramadan.He raised over £50,000 and worked with an Indonesian charity to build 23 homes for families forced to live in shelters in the city of Kendari following the 6.5 magnitude Ambon earthquake in September 2019.

“I had a friend out there who was doing some projects with people who were affected by the earthquake in Kendari, which is in South East Sulawesi,” he said.

“I wanted to do something for the people and I made communication with a local charity organisation who were doing voluntary work to build houses. Once I opened discussions with them I thought it could be a fantastic opportunity to help.

“I built the houses at a really good price. Each house cost £3,000 to build and they were proper brick-structured buildings - but the labour cost was free. To build houses like that wouldn’t have been possible anywhere in the world.

“Now I’ve set myself a new challenge and I would like to work with these people again.”

Mr Mahmood’s website, where you can learn more about the ‘Ramadan Man’s’ Ben Nevis climb and previous charity work, will go live this Friday (25 March).

If you would like to donate to help him build the orphanage in Indonesia, there will be a link to his donations page on his website.