Street art hopes to end drain pollution

New drains artwork commissioned  by Peterborough City Council outside Norwood School.  Joely Norris, Andrew Leadbetter, Craig Campbell and Andy Tatt from PCC with with artist Stuart Payn and Norwood School pupil and designer Thomas Sharpe (9) EMN-180720-144050009
New drains artwork commissioned by Peterborough City Council outside Norwood School. Joely Norris, Andrew Leadbetter, Craig Campbell and Andy Tatt from PCC with with artist Stuart Payn and Norwood School pupil and designer Thomas Sharpe (9) EMN-180720-144050009
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Peterborough streets have been given a thought provoking new colour scheme thanks to artistic minds in schools and behind bars.

Two schemes have seen bright street art painted on the pavement and on junction boxes in the city

New drains artwork commissioned  by Peterborough City Council outside  Werrington Primary School. EMN-180720-144113009

New drains artwork commissioned by Peterborough City Council outside Werrington Primary School. EMN-180720-144113009

One project has seen youngsters design art on the pavement to encourage residents to think about what is poured down drains.

The Yellow Fish campaign was launched by the Environment Agency and is centred on an approach to protecting the environment.

It is based around the idea of painting a yellow fish symbol beside drains to remind people that any waste entering them may go directly to the nearest stream, river, lake, canal, beach or bathing water - causing pollution and killing wildlife.

School pupils were asked to come up with colourful ideas to promote the scheme - with two winning designs painted on the pavement near drains outside their schools.

Street artwork at junction of Princes Street and Brioadway. EMN-180720-144124009

Street artwork at junction of Princes Street and Brioadway. EMN-180720-144124009

The winning artists were Thomas Sharpe (9) from Norwood Primary and Lucy Ollerton (10) from Werrington Primary.

Andrew Leadbetter, sustainable drainage manager for Peterborough City Council, said: “We think this campaign is a great way of highlighting a very important issue. Seeing a big bright colourful fish and a message next to a drain really makes people take notice.

“The campaign has been successful nationally and we’re confident that will be the same in Peterborough. We’ve really enjoyed getting the schools involved, seeing the pupils enjoy themselves and learn about the environment.”

An Anglian Water spokesperson said: “Roadside drains, which are managed by local councils, are only designed to take rainwater. Unlike our drainage network, flow from roadside drains is not treated before it ends up back in our rivers and seas which is why it’s even more critical that we do not tip waste down drains.”

Street artwork at junction of Princes Street and Brioadway. EMN-180720-144039009

Street artwork at junction of Princes Street and Brioadway. EMN-180720-144039009

Another scheme has seen prisoners at HMP Peterborough working on art for junction boxes in the city.

Three junction boxes near Peterborough Central Park have been turned into canvasses for the art - which includes a tribute to Jimmy the Donkey, a WW1 donkey from the Somme who was brought to the city and used to raise funds for the RSPCA.

The junction boxes had previously been a hotspot for graffiti vandals.

Damian Evans, HMP Peterborough director, said: “Purposeful activity in prison, particularly where it has a positive, direct impact on the local community, encourages offenders to change for the better and to feel like valued members of their communities once again.

Street artwork at junction of Princes Street and Brioadway. EMN-180720-144028009

Street artwork at junction of Princes Street and Brioadway. EMN-180720-144028009

“We are very pleased this project involving Peterborough City Council and Virgin Media has been so well received.”