Pupils in New England create NSPCC inspired film

The Fulbridge Academy filmmakers.
The Fulbridge Academy filmmakers.
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Pupils at a Fulbridge Academy have created a film to educate other children about abuse and neglect.

The members the school council filmed and edited the video after taking part in the NSPCC’s Speak Out Stay Safe Service.

The Fulbridge Academy filmmakers.

The Fulbridge Academy filmmakers.

In the video pupils discuss what abuse and neglect are, and list some of the trusted adults that children can talk to about issues that concern them.

The film recaps some of the key messages from the 
assemblies and workshops that pupils took part in with the NSPCC in a bid to spread them to a wider audience.

The NSPCC’s Speak Out Stay Safe programme was delivered to more than 8,000 children at 22 primary schools in Peterborough during the last academic year.

The scheme teaches children about sexual, physical and emotional abuse, neglect and bullying in an age-appropriate way, and gives youngsters the tools to speak out about things that make them upset, hurt or uncomfortable with the help of speech bubble mascot Buddy.

Michelle Newton, NSPCC, Schools Service Coordinator for Peterborough 
said: “Our Speak Out Stay 
Safe programme aims to empower children to stay safe from abuse, so what better way to consume this message 
than share it with other children.

“The film is fantastic and shows that children are engaged with the issues we discuss at assemblies and workshops and understand the importance of speaking out and staying safe.

“I want to thank everyone involved for spreading the work we do to a wider audience while, importantly, having fun and learning new skills in the process.”

Ben Erskine, Principal of Fulbridge Academy, said: “We are always very keen to work with and support the NSPCC. We to believe that every child needs to be equipped with the skills and strengths to deal with the difficulties and challenges that life may throw at them.

“We have always aspired to create resilient children who are risk takers, but understand boundaries and can adapt and cope in different situations.

“We are very appreciative of the work and expertise that NSPCC do to support children.”