SWANNY’S WORLD OF SPORT: Coleman is not the man for the job, tennis in decline, Eddie is a genius, BT Sports shambles

Chris Coleman is the wrong man for Sunderland.
Chris Coleman is the wrong man for Sunderland.
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Sunderland must have offered Chris Coleman a huge pile of cash to take their manager’s job.

Or his stock has fallen so much following a dismal World Cup campaign with Wales this was the best job he could now get.

Gregor Dimitrov won a poor final.

Gregor Dimitrov won a poor final.

Sunderland would have been better advised throwing their cash at a new set of players. Their’s is a slump that isn’t set to end anytime soon and there is little on Coleman’s CV to suggest he can do better than previous boss Simon Grayson, someone who actually knew the Championship pretty well. Unless Coleman can sign Gareth Bale, Sunderland will be hosting Posh in League One next season.

West Brom could also be doomed now they’ve dumped Tony Pulis, unless they do what Everton should have done and hire Sam Allardyce.

A GOLDEN ERA IS ALMOST OVER

Anyone who seriously believes there is strength in depth in men’s tennis didn’t watch the error strewn Tour Final between Grigor Dimitrov and David Goffin last weekend. A golden era of true greats is coming to an end, sadly.

Danni Wyatt was an english heroine.

Danni Wyatt was an english heroine.

GIVE ENGLAND THE CUP NOW

As an Aussie, Eddie Jones shouldn’t coach England’s rugby union team, but my goodness he’s such a genuis tactician and a supreme motivator they may as well give us the World Cup now.

ABYSMAL RESEARCH FOR TV

Add BT Sport to the list of channels with no clue how to cover live football in a watchable way. Stating that Posh signed Britt Assombalonga from non-league was abysmal research.

HEROINE OF THE WEEK

I’m no lover of women’s cricket, but I was captivated by the final T20 match in the Australia v England series (I refuse to use the term ‘Ashes’). There was some comedy catching attempts from the Aussies, but the batting of Danni Wyatt, who became England’s first century maker in this format, was remarkable.