Family and friends pay emotional tributes to happy, funny Suzanne

Jason Sharpe at the Cambridgeshire Deaf Association tribute meeting at the Friends Meeting House, Thorpe Road to Suzanne Foulstone EMN-171104-150500009
Jason Sharpe at the Cambridgeshire Deaf Association tribute meeting at the Friends Meeting House, Thorpe Road to Suzanne Foulstone EMN-171104-150500009
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Funny, supportive, joyful and with a heart of gold - just some of the many tributes which flooded in for Suzanne Foulstone who was killed in a collision on the A47 at Castor.

Suzanne (44) of Lavender Crescent, Dogsthorpe, passed away after last Thursday evening’s crash, and her death has sparked huge grief in the deaf community both in Peterborough and outside.

Suzanne Foulstone

Suzanne Foulstone

Suzanne’s selflessness and love of life, despite suffering from ME, and her wicked sense of humour, were touched upon by her many friends who shared their memories on Tuesday at the Quakers Meeting House in Thorpe Road.

Cheryl Matthews, of Hampton Vale, was one of many people desperate to pay tribute. She said: “Suzanne was kind but had a really good sense of humour. She was always getting up to mischief,

“She was always so busy and loved dancing. She loved travelling and would visit her friends all over the place. She was so full of life and full of love for everybody.”

Suzanne, who was deaf, grew up in Grantham before moving to Peterborough as an adult to be closer to her mum.

Cambridgeshire Deaf Association tribute meeting at the Friends Meeting House, Thorpe Road to Suzanne Foulstone

Cambridgeshire Deaf Association tribute meeting at the Friends Meeting House, Thorpe Road to Suzanne Foulstone

She had been a volunteer befriender for the Cambridgeshire Deaf Association for 12 years and always made new members very welcome. That included driving to King’s Lynn to see Emma Burrows and Leslie McCabe as they learned sign language.

Leslie said: “There’s nothing more intimidating than walking into a deaf club when you have GCSE sign language, but she was so supportive and would give us a big hug and ask how we are.”

Emma said: “I’m now a qualified interpreter, and it’s only thanks to people like Suzanne that we can get the qualification which is so hard to achieve.” She added: “She would always ask for deaf tea which was short for decaf. She would wind you up about it!”

Aziz Ibrahim (19) came to Wisbech from the northeast African country of Eritrea. He said: “When I first came here I did not know any British Sign Language. Suzanne saw me and said ‘come on, I will help you’.

Cambridgeshire Deaf Association tribute meeting at the Friends Meeting House, Thorpe Road to Suzanne Foulstone

Cambridgeshire Deaf Association tribute meeting at the Friends Meeting House, Thorpe Road to Suzanne Foulstone

“She tried to build up my confidence and would tell everyone to support me. I’m going to be lost without her.”

Kay Hardwick, of Alderman’s Drive, knew Suzanne for 25 years, and described her as like “my little sister.”

She said: “She was a wonderful woman - always happy and always positive. She never had a negative thing to say.

“I loved it when we used to go out to deaf clubs, deaf pubs or have afternoon tea. We used to see each other pretty much every day and now that’s gone.”

Pauline Bacon, sat next to husband Michael, had known Suzanne from an early age in Grantham. She recalled: “She was a bit naughty, had a good laugh and enjoyed teasing people. She was very sociable.

“She had a heart of gold. She was a joy to be around and I will keep her in my heart. I can’t believe she’s gone, it’s such a shock.”

Emily Stone, of Walton, is part of the communications support team at Peterborough Regional College where Suzanne studied IT and accounting. She said: “She was so well loved by everybody. She always wanted to help people and did it with a smile.”

Andy Palmer, managing director of Cambridgeshire Deaf Association, said: “She was an outstanding volunteer and made she made such a difference to those she volunteered with.”

Suzanne’s sister Jenny Davison said: “Suzanne was a much loved sister, auntie and daughter who was incredibly independent despite the challenges of her health and her deafness.

“While there will forever be a part of me missing, the outpouring of love from her family and friends goes some way to filling that hole.

“Susie took great joy in feeding and playing with her new baby niece (Rebecca, turns one this month) and she was incredibly proud watching her 14-year-old niece (Charlotte) and 18-year-old nephew (Josh) grow up. Her home was filled with pictures of the children.

“Sue had a large extended family and will be desperately missed by everybody, but we will treasure the memories we have of Sue.”