Video: Magical wooden circle to remember wife

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A husband from near Peterborough has paid tribute to his late wife by creating his own giant wooden version of Stonehenge on his farm.

Stephen Parsley (50) has been working with artist Derek Massey to create the ‘Moonhenge’ using prehistoric timber in Woodwalton, near Sawtry in tribute to Stephen’s wife Judy Cole, who died last year.

DCIM\101GOPRO

DCIM\101GOPRO

The monument will be able to be seen by passing trains, includes 30 giant logs, up to 21 feet tall in the large circle.

The installation is made of a large outer circle, of 19 logs, and an inner ring of 10 logs, with one pair of logs having an additional horizontal log.

Stephen said: “The layout is in line with the lunar calendar, as the moon was a significant part of our relationship - we were always intrigued by the power of the full moon.

“It is something I talked about for a long time, and am delighted it is finished. It is exactly how I envisioned it.”

Judy Cole. Photo supplied

Judy Cole. Photo supplied

Judy died aged 44 after a five year battle with multiple sclerosis.

The wooden circle will officially be opened on Wednesday 21 August, the nearest full moon to the anniversary of her death.

Stephen said: “Judy’s ashes are in Devon with the rest of her family, so there is no-where near here for me to visit and remember her.

“This will be somewhere I can come and visit.

Stephen Parsley on the site of the Moonhenge he has had built on his farm in Wood Walton Fen in memory of his wife Judy Cole  with artist Derek Massey. Photo: Rowland Hobson

Stephen Parsley on the site of the Moonhenge he has had built on his farm in Wood Walton Fen in memory of his wife Judy Cole with artist Derek Massey. Photo: Rowland Hobson

“It already has a magic feel to it. I get goosebumps when I come here.”

The moonhenge is aligned with the lunar calendar, and also the summer solstice.

Derek Massey, who is also working on a large sculpture of Olympic medalist Louis Smith to be placed in a neighbouring field, said: “We are working on a number of other features at the site.

“For the opening there will be five large drapes on the inner ring, with depictions of cave paintings and whales.

“There will also be performances and speeches at the opening.

“When everything is completed, from above it will look like a constellation,”

While there are a number of similarities between the new wooden circle and Stonehenge, Derek said there were also a number of differences.

He said: “The bog oak timber is 9,0000 years old, and was dug up from the Fens around here.

“It is almost like fossilised wood, and is actually older than Stonehenge itself.

“It also only took us a week to construct the circle, compared to the centuries it took to build Stonehenge. But of course we had modern equipment to use.

“The opening ceremony will be a very traditional ceremony, like ones that have been carried out for many years.

“In the old days people would have performances in and around the circle, and it is something we are looking at doing.”