Peterborough honours Katharine of Aragon during annual festival

Commemoration service for Katharine of Aragon at Peterborough Cathedral.  Children processing through the city centre on the way to the Cathedral EMN-160129-133020009

Commemoration service for Katharine of Aragon at Peterborough Cathedral. Children processing through the city centre on the way to the Cathedral EMN-160129-133020009

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Peterborough honoured Katharine of Aragon with a series of events in the city.

Last Friday (January 29) at around 10am a procession of civic dignitaries, schoolchildren and the period musicians of Hautbois proceeded from Peterborough Museum to Peterborough Cathedral for a Service of Commemoration.

Commemoration service for Katharine of Aragon at Peterborough Cathedral. EMN-160129-133056009

Commemoration service for Katharine of Aragon at Peterborough Cathedral. EMN-160129-133056009

During the service wreaths were laid on Katharine’s tomb, and her moving last letter to Henry VIII was read.

Katharine of Aragon, Henry’s first wife, was buried at the cathedral on January 29, 1536, and this important link with Tudor history is commemorated every year .

The Katharine of Aragon Festival, which runs from January 28-31, is a collaboration between Peterborough Cathedral and Vivacity Peterborough.

On Friday evening, TV historian and writer Dr Jonathan Foyle gave an illustrated talk about “The forgotten origins of the Tudor rose.”

Commemoration service for Katharine of Aragon at Peterborough Cathedral. EMN-160129-133122009

Commemoration service for Katharine of Aragon at Peterborough Cathedral. EMN-160129-133122009

Dr Foyle, one of the panellists on BBC2’s Great History Quiz on Christmas Eve and a former curator at Hampton Court, explained some of the mysteries behind the Tudor rose symbol in King Henry and Queen Katharine’s time.

Before the talk a Tudor-style Pottage and Ale supper was served in the Becket Chapel at the cathedral, served by staff in Tudor costume and with Tudor music from Hautbois.

At Peterborough Museum visitors were also able to travel back in time and discover what life was like “At home with the Tudors”.

With the help of historical re-enactors they were able to handle arms and armour, try Tudor food and hear about some of the gruesome cures offered by the Barber Surgeon.