SWANNY’S WORLD OF SPORT: It won’t get any better than this

England's Rhian Brewster, Joel Latibeaudiere (centre) and Phil Foden (right) pose for a photo as the Under-17 World Cup winning side arrive back to the UK.
England's Rhian Brewster, Joel Latibeaudiere (centre) and Phil Foden (right) pose for a photo as the Under-17 World Cup winning side arrive back to the UK.
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I hope Rhian Brewster and Phil Foden, and particularly the rather less heralded players like Angel Gomes, remember every second of their thrilling capture of the Under 17 World Cup capture.

Sadly it’s probably as good as it will get for them in their entire football careers.

England's Angel Gomes holds the Under 17 World Cup trophy.

England's Angel Gomes holds the Under 17 World Cup trophy.

Judged by their performances in India, it seems ridiculous to even suggest Brewster and Foden at least will fail to enjoy superb and lengthy club careers, but I wouldn’t bank on it, and not just because performing well against players of your own age group is far removed from what lies ahead.

Many young players don’t ‘train on’ either, but there are other more avoidable pitfalls in the way of any young player hoping to make it at Manchester City or Liverpool, even those who have delivered the remarkable feat of outclassing Brazil and Spain in back-to-back games.

The last England team to win a serious age group event before 2017 was the under 18s in the 1993 Euros. That team included Gary Neville, Sol Campbell, Paul Scholes and Robbie Fowler who all went on to enjoy illustrious careers at the biggest English clubs, as well as Arsenal and Spurs.

But football was a different sport in this country then. If cheap imports on the books of all-powerful agents were as dominant almost 25 years ago as they are now some top careers might have been strangled at birth.

England's Under 17 players need to be kept away from Under 21 manager Aidy Boothroyd.

England's Under 17 players need to be kept away from Under 21 manager Aidy Boothroyd.

That’s the danger for Foden, Brewster and co, players who would already light up the likes of Stoke and West Brom, if not half of the current Premier League.

It’s easy for top bosses Pep Guardiola and Jurgen Klopp to pay lip service to the inevitable clamour for world cup winners to be given first-team chances. It’s easy for the clubs to bask in the reflected glory of a 5-2 thumping of Spain.

But City won’t need Foden in the next few years and Liverpool won’t need Brewster, although if the latter was a centre-half it might be a different story.

Why would Guardiola gamble on a teenager when he has access to billions of pounds of oil money, a fact that demands he delivers trophy after trophy during his time at the Etihad?

And the way Klopp is going he needs to shore up his own position rather than help potential England internationals of the future develop their careers.

Young Wales international Ben Woodburn doesn’t get a game at Anfield even though Klopp’s boys have struggled badly at times this season.

If they are lucky some of England’s all-conquering under 17 side will be able to cut their teeth in the Championship before too long. Their only hope of playing regularly for a Premier League club before the age of 21 is to move to Spurs where they might be entrusted with Football League Cup appearances.

The under 17 squad will hopefully stay within the England set-up, but then they face the prospect of being coached by Aidy Boothroyd or Gareth Southgate and that can’t turn out well.