Remember Liz and her example - MP for Peterborough Fiona Onasanya

MP for Peterborough Fiona Onasanya
MP for Peterborough Fiona Onasanya
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W hen you look at a candidate standing on a platform waiting for an election result to be announced by the Returning Officer, it is easy to forget that few campaigns are comprised of just one individual. Certainly, the person you see bears the responsibility, but there are so many others that help nearly every candidate get to that point.

When I stood on the platform at the East of England Arena this past June, and my result was announced, I was conscious of this: I could see many members of my dedicated, hardworking team in the crowd. They were smiling back at me. However, one vital person couldn’t be there: Elizabeth Jane Moon. Sadly, this point of introduction is also one of departure: she passed away on September 8 aged just 64.

Liz Moon

Liz Moon

Anyone who has had anything to do with the Peterborough Labour Party knew Liz. She held numerous posts within the Peterborough Labour Party and its North & Rural Branch. Her knowledge of rules and election law was encyclopaedic; her capacity for hard work was enormous, even though it subtracted much from a well-deserved retirement. Her wit and sense of humour often interjected a note of levity into meetings. She was endlessly kind and thoughtful. But if I was to summarise what she did for the Party and for me, it can be encapsulated in a single phrase: she kept us all on track.

In politics as in life, there are often competing priorities: should I accept invitation X, should I go to meeting Y? There are often confusing choices. Liz knew what was proper and correct; she was also brave. She stood up for what was right and she always stood shoulder to shoulder with those who did the same regardless of how difficult that may have been. Furthermore, I could turn to her and she would invariably provide a sensible answer to any question. I know that my colleagues within the Peterborough Labour Party share these sentiments.

Liz had other causes which were close to her heart: for example, she was involved in charitable work and the Co-operative movement. She gave so much of herself, not for glory, nor for recognition, but because she wanted to make the world around her a better place.

Regardless of one’s political affiliation, we should remember her and her example. Wherever she is, and my faith suggests it is far beyond mortal care and pain, I pray and am certain that she is at peace. As my colleagues and I continue our work in our wonderful city, we will remember Liz, her work, morals, ethics, and tenacity as we strive to build a better world.