Moving service as Peterborough war hero laid to rest

Funeral of Terence Sismore at St Matthew's Church, Eye attended by members of the Royal Military Police Association from Colchester anf Fenland branches (red berets) and serving soldiers from the 156 Regiment RMP (red caps) EMN-170420-154255009
Funeral of Terence Sismore at St Matthew's Church, Eye attended by members of the Royal Military Police Association from Colchester anf Fenland branches (red berets) and serving soldiers from the 156 Regiment RMP (red caps) EMN-170420-154255009
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A war hero from Peterborough who was given France’s top honour has been laid to rest at an emotional service.

The funeral of Terence Sismore - better known as Terry - was held on Thursday, with services at St Matthew’s Church in Eye and at the Peterborough Crematorium.

Terry Sismore

Terry Sismore

He had died on March 25, aged 93.

Terry’s family and friends were joined at the services by members of Royal Military Police Associations, who all wore red caps, while Terry’s coffin was draped in a Union flag.

Terry had been a member of the military police during the Second World War, taking part in the D-Day landings in 1944.

He was awarded the Légion d’honneur last year.

Funeral of Terence Sismore at St Matthew's Church, Eye attended by members of the Royal Military Police Association from Colchester anf Fenland branches (red berets) and serving soldiers from the 156 Regiment RMP (red caps) EMN-170420-153915009

Funeral of Terence Sismore at St Matthew's Church, Eye attended by members of the Royal Military Police Association from Colchester anf Fenland branches (red berets) and serving soldiers from the 156 Regiment RMP (red caps) EMN-170420-153915009

His granddaughter Louise Maloney said the family were very proud of Terry’s achievements.

She said: “My grandad was very proud of his country and what he fought for many years ago and would always be talking war stories with anyone he met.

“We as a family have always been proud of him and very much so when he received his ‘ Order National de la Legion d’Honneur’ medal last February from the Peterborough mayor on behalf of the French government.

“My main memories of my grandad was a happy family man who would do anything for his family and friends, who enjoyed many activities such as gliding, motorbikes and playing golf or pottering around his immaculate garden or on his allotment.”

Funeral of Terence Sismore at St Matthew's Church, Eye attended by members of the Royal Military Police Association from Colchester anf Fenland branches (red berets) and serving soldiers from the 156 Regiment RMP (red caps) EMN-170420-153949009

Funeral of Terence Sismore at St Matthew's Church, Eye attended by members of the Royal Military Police Association from Colchester anf Fenland branches (red berets) and serving soldiers from the 156 Regiment RMP (red caps) EMN-170420-153949009

Terry - who was born on February 29 1924, and claimed to be younger than he was as he only got a birthday every four years - married Doreen after meeting at a wedding in Eye, where they both grew up. They had one son, Michael, and one grandchild.

Louise said: “Although the family was small we always spent a lot of time together most weekends and special occasions, being the only grandchild I hate to say it but i was very spoilt over the years whilst growing up as nan and grandad liked to see their family happy and enjoying life.”

Unfortunately Terry had to be separated from Doreen about two years ago when he needed extra care and he went to live at Garden Lodge care home in Glinton where they were exceptional at looking after him.

He lost his wife April 2016 and sadly Terry’s health started to deteriorate late last year.

Funeral of Terence Sismore at Peterborough Crematorium  attended by members of the Royal Military Police Association from Colchester anf Fenland branches (red berets) and serving soldiers from the 156 Regiment RMP (red caps) EMN-170420-154400009

Funeral of Terence Sismore at Peterborough Crematorium attended by members of the Royal Military Police Association from Colchester anf Fenland branches (red berets) and serving soldiers from the 156 Regiment RMP (red caps) EMN-170420-154400009

Along with his military service, Terry worked at Perkins from his teenage years to his retirement.

Louise said; “He left Perkins for a short while when he got called up for the army at age 18 and went on to take part in operation overlord, landing on Gold beach in Normandy on June 8th 1944 at age 20 where he served with the 59th Divisional Provost Company in a motor cyclist control unit and in his words “ immediately found himself under heavy fire from German guns”

“He would always say that he could still hear the fighter aircraft above and not know if they were British or German.

“In 1945 he became an instructor at the military police school in Germany.”

Mike Seabourne MBE, president of the Fenland branch of the Royal Military Police Association, said: “In 2010, the Military Police Association fomed a branch in Peterborough - he was a founder member, and the oldest member.

“On D-Day he set up traffic control - there were no maps or mobile phones then, and he had to make sure the large number of convoys went the right way, the right order.

“They would often find themselves under fire from military aircraft - their role was extremely important and dangerous.

“He was a sprightly, good spirited and energetic man.

“His funeral was a very moving experience - people came from Salisbury, Hull, Leicester and Northamptonshire to be there.”