Looking Back: Head for heights

A steeplejack at work on the cathedral
A steeplejack at work on the cathedral

Usually, I like to have a theme running through the Looking Back pictures.But this week the theme is “there is no theme!’’.

I’d like to tell you the pictures are all taken from a beautifully collated archive,but the truth is that I found all the ones I use in an old cardboard box gathering dust in a corner of the office.

Action from a Posh vs Northampton game. Was it in the 40s?

Action from a Posh vs Northampton game. Was it in the 40s?

Today’s pictures, as usual, have scant details with them, but caught my eye for one reason or antother.

The first picture is a spectacular one of a steeplejack at work on the cathedral. It doesn’t actually date back that far with a stamp on the back of the photo saying it was taken on November 25 1982.

The next pictures are older. A hapless Peterborough United (or was it Fletton United?) goalkeeper is photographed letting in a goal versus local rivals Northampton perhaps in the 1940s. I’m assuming it’s London Road, but I’m sure the Posh fans out there will put me right if it’s not.

The next picture is Cathedral Square – the picture isn’t dated so I don’t know if its name had changed from Market Place.

Cathedral Square or was it still Market Place?

Cathedral Square or was it still Market Place?

Now for a couple of firsts for the city. We have a picture of the city’s first parking warden taken in May 1966.

Does anyone know his name? Does anyone remember getting a ticket from him?

The next picture, according to the caption on the back of it, is the first diesel lorry. Taken in 1929, its pictured with its driver Albert Scrimshaw. Does anyone know what Albert was doing sitting in the middle of the lorry?

The final picture is a perhaps unremarkable shot of the medical room at Baker Perkins taken in the 1930s.

The city's first traffic warden.

The city's first traffic warden.

The patient on the left has obviously suffered a hand injury and it reminded me of that old joke “he didn’t know he’d hurt himself until he was saying goodbye to his foreman!’’

Finally, I received an interesting email from a J Steel who wrote: “While doing some research on large clocks I came across an anomaly.

“In early Victorian times each town or city would set its clocks by the sun. This meant that cities in the west were up to 20 minutes behind London time.

“With the coming of the railways it played havoc with trying to set timetables. In the 1850s Standard time was introduced based on GMT. Not everybody was happy with the idea but GMT came in by default anyway.

The first diesel lorry with driver Albert Scrimshaw

The first diesel lorry with driver Albert Scrimshaw

“The citizens of Peterborough opted to have two minute hands on their clock. One showing GMT and one showing Peterborough time.’’

If anyone knows about this please get in touch.

Medical room at Baker Perkins in the 1930s

Medical room at Baker Perkins in the 1930s