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ROSS TRIAL: The guilty men

UNTIL he became a teenager, Shaied Nazir, of Cromwell Road, had followed the strict Muslim traditions of his parents and lived a law-abiding life.

UNTIL he became a teenager, Shaied Nazir, of Cromwell Road, had followed the strict Muslim traditions of his parents and lived a law-abiding life.Shaied Nazir

UNTIL he became a teenager, Shaied Nazir, of Cromwell Road, had followed the strict Muslim traditions of his parents and lived a law-abiding life.

But, when he reached adolescence, he started rebelling against the values he had been taught by his parents.

The 22-year-old started smoking drugs, drinking heavily, and staying out late with his friends.

In March 1999, he was cautioned by King's Lynn police for using threatening behaviour.

And in April 2002, he was fined 50 for failing to surrender to custody during proceedings at which he was charged with taking a car and driving it under the influence of excess alcohol. He was found not guilty.

When having his fingerprints taken after being arrested on suspicion of Ross's murder, Nazir told officers: "I wish I had not bothered going out that night. You know I never meant for anyone to get hurt."

Ahmed Ali Awan

FOR Ahmed Ali Awan, the brutal stabbing of Ross Parker was a way of proving his "superiority" within the gang.

During the Ross Parker murder trial, Awan (22), of Gladstone Street, was described as a "gangster" who had a fantasy for knives and thought of himself as "something special".

The court heard he was an unofficial police informer who had told officers about hard drug dealing in his area. He also kept a scanner in his house which could be used to pick up police radio frequencies.

After his arrest he was remanded in custody at Bedford Prison. On his arrival at the prison, the court heard he saw an inmate he knew, called Darren Boardman, who warned him that other prisoners would want to attack him for what he had done to Ross.

Awan responded by describing the killing to Boardman in lurid detail and pointing on his body to where Ross had been stabbed.

Sarfraz Ali

SARFRAZ Ali was given glowing character references by two city councillors, but witnesses said he had a "dark side".

Up to the night of Ross's murder last year, Ali (25), of Harris Street, had lived a normal life and had never been in trouble with the law.

The court heard his father played major role at a city mosque and Ali had been married in September 2000.

But, during the trial, the court heard there was a different side to Ali.

The court was told that Ali's wife had left him in the middle of the trial because she was scared of him and his family.

The jury was also told that she may have found out about his involvement in the murder of Ross after seeing his bloody clothing.

Ali said that out of his three co-accused, he was closest to Awan.

The pair concocted a false story saying neither of them had been at the scene of the killing. But the jury did not believe the lies.

>> Check tomorrow's Evening Telegraph and peterboroughnow.co.uk for the full background on the six-week murder trial

 

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