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COURT: Expert tells jury of DNA linking Nazir to knife used in killing of Ross

TRACES of DNA discovered on the handle of a knife used to kill Ross Parker almost certainly came from Shaied Nazir, a court heard.

TRACES of DNA discovered on the handle of a knife used to kill Ross Parker almost certainly came from Shaied Nazir, a court heard. TRACES of DNA discovered on the handle of a knife used to kill Ross Parker almost certainly came from Shaied Nazir, a court heard.

Isobel Setford, who specialises in DNA analysis, told Northampton Crown Court there was a "one in a billion" chance that the DNA belonged to someone else.

The court heard that the knife, which has a 12-inch serrated blade, was discovered by police when they searched a garage at the back of Nazir's home at 122 Cromwell Road.

Mrs Setford said "major" and "minor" good quality and poor quality profiles of DNA had been discovered in swabs taken from the weapon.

She said the major component on the handle matched Nazir's DNA.

Nazir (22), Ziaraff Mahrad (21), of Cromwell Road, Ahmed Ali Awan (22), of Gladstone Street, and Sarfraz Ali (25), of Harris Street, all deny murdering Ross in the early hours of Friday, September 21, last year.

The court has heard that Ross was punched, kicked, hit with hammer and stabbed with a large knife by a gang of men.

The prosecution has previously told the jury that Ross had been stabbed about three times to the back of the neck.

Ross suffered "extensive blood loss" at the scene and his blood was later found on clothes belonging to two of the accused, the court has been told.

Mrs Setford said: "The probability of that particular profile appearing at random from the population from someone other than and unrelated to Shaied Nazir is estimated at one in a billion, or a thousand million."

Mrs Setford said other minor profiles were found on the knife, but they did not belong to any of the three others accused or Ross.

She also ruled out the possibility of the major profile coming from Nazir's younger brother, Wyed, who has told the court he saw his brother cleaning the knife on the night of the killing.

She said the profile taken from the weapon could have come from a bodily fluid such as sweat.

The court also heard yesterday that DNA discovered on the collar of a white Firetrap shirt was linked to Mahrad and Ross.

Alison Fendley, an expert in the examination of body fluid and DNA evidence, said profiles originating from two people had been taken from the collar of a white Firetrap shirt.

She said the major profile had a "match probability" with Ziaraff Mahrad of one in 8.3 million.

Ms Fendley said the remaining component on the shirt was "attributable to Ross Parker".

The jury heard that when experts examined the hammer, which the prosecution claims was used to batter Ross, they could find no DNA profile.

Three balaclavas, which the prosecution says were worn by Ross's attackers, were also examined after being recovered from a white plastic bag behind a mattress in the garage at Nazir's home.

But Ms Fendley said the traces of DNA discovered were not substantial enough, and no links could be found to any of the defendants.

The court heard that two cups were examined which had been taken from the garage at Nazir's home.

Ms Fendley said that a major profile found on one of the cups had a "match probability" with Sarfraz Ali of "one in 109 million".

Minor profiles were also obtained from the same cup and could have come from a combination of Nazir's and Awan's DNA.

The jury were told that this could be explained by the three men having shared the cup.

Mrs Fendley said there was no major profile obtained from the second cup, but DNA traces were discovered linking it to Nazir and Awan.

The court also heard about several items of clothing, which had been seized by police, and could be linked to all four of the defendants.

Tests on jacket linked it to Awan

A JACKET seized by police after the killing of Ross Parker was linked to Ahmed Ali Awan by DNA evidence, a court heard.

It was found during a search of Shaied Nazir's house and shed at 122 Cromwell Road, Northampton Crown Court was told.

Alison Fendley, a DNA expert, said a DNA profile taken from the collar of the jacket was found to match that of Awan (22).

The court has previously heard that Awan claimed he went home at about 12.15am on the night of the attack and was not at the scene.

Mrs Fendley said there was a one in 204 possibility that the profile discovered on the jacket did not belong to Awan.

Yesterday, Mrs Fendley also told the court that DNA from at least two different people had been discovered on a white Umbro sock, while DNA from three different people had been found on a blue Nike sock.

The prosecution has previously claimed in court that the socks were worn by Ziaraff Mahrad (21) on the night of the killing.

Ms Fendley said she could not rule out that Mahrad had worn the socks.

But she added she could not find a link between the socks and the other three accused Nazir, Ahmed Ali Awan and Sarfraz Ali.

The court has previously heard that Nazir (22) and Mahrad (21) told police they got blood on their clothes after witnessing the attack on Ross on Friday, September 21, last year.

The court heard that a pair of black Petroleum boots were also recovered, again from Nazir's home, which could have made marks in blood at the scene of Ross's death.

Ms Fendley said the boots had DNA profiles on them matching Nazir, his brother Wyed, and another unidentified person.

The court also heard that a pair of blue Yves Saint Laurent trousers and a cream-coloured jumper found at the house had DNA links to Mahrad.

 

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