Home birth mum backs accused male midwife

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THE woman whose baby was delivered at home by a male midwife who defied hospital rules, dramatically waived her right to anonymity to declare: "I am 100 per cent behind him".

THE woman whose baby was delivered at home by a male midwife who defied hospital rules, dramatically waived her right to anonymity to declare: "I am 100 per cent behind him".Speaking to TheET following the third day of the hearing into the actions of Paul Beland (49), Louise Le Voi (35) said she wanted to thank him for “carrying out her wishes”.

Mrs Le Voi’s son Jonny, now two years old, was delivered by the community midwife on July 11, 2004, despite knowing that the Peterborough and Stamford Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust’s home birth service had been temporarily suspended a week before.

The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) in London was told he wasn’t supposed to be on duty at the time, but had given the patient his mobile number.

Beland, of Victoria Place, Bourne, is also accused of attending her home without emergency equipment, which he denies.

But Mrs Le Voi, ne Cutteridge, of Chapel Street, Werrington, Peterborough, said Beland’s care had been “fantastic”.

She said: “I want to show my complete support for Paul and what he did. From the stories, it sounds like I was at death’s door.

“But I’ve had three children, and Jonny was, by far, the best birthing experience I have had.

“Paul carried out my wishes of having my baby at home, which I had planned for six months. I completely thank Paul for having the guts and determination to stand up for what I wanted.

“Paul and I knew about the suspension of home births. But I was also aware midwives have a duty of care to attend women in labour.

“And I couldn’t be forced to go into hospital at that short notice. He did the right thing by me.”

During Friday’s hearing, Beland insisted he made sure baby Jonny was delivered as “safely as possible”.

Beland, Peterborough’s only male midwife, said: “On the night of the home birth itself, because the woman in question was not a high risk, there was no precedence that I knew of for involving the supervisor of midwives, and I didn’t think they would expect to be informed.”

Asked what the most important piece of equipment to take to a home birth was, Beland replied “the midwife”.

When asked why he left at 7am, before the delivery was completed, Beland said he was satisfied Mrs De Voi had two midwives with her.

Beland’s solicitor John Sherratt said he had carried out more home births than any of the other community midwives.

The hearing will now resume on November 2, when the panel will decide if Beland’s actions amount to misconduct.