Anti drink drive campaign launches with warning to motorists

Cambridgeshire Constabulary.
Cambridgeshire Constabulary.
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The SaferPeterborough Partnership is supporting the national THINK! anti drink-driving campaign which launched this week and will run until January 3, 2016.

The campaign targets those drivers who still think it is safe to have a couple of drinks before driving.

Advertising on TV, radio, social media and billboards feature realistic scenarios where people consider driving after two drinks, with potentially deadly consequences.

In 2013 there were 240 deaths where at least one driver was over the limit, contributing to 13 per cent of all road deaths. 1,100 people were seriously injured due to drink driving.

New THINK! research shows that while half the population (51 per cent) would not consider having any drinks before driving, one in 10 people would consider having two or more drinks before getting behind the wheel – putting themselves and others at risk.

This increases to one in five among men aged 17 to 34.

Councillor Nigel North, cabinet member for communities at Peterborough City Council, said: “Over the years, deaths from drink driving have reduced dramatically, but there are unfortunately still too many accidents - and especially at this time of year.

“The THINK! campaign has a very clear message and we are giving it our full backing. There is no excuse to drink and drive at Christmas or at any other time of the year.”

Clair George from SaferPeterborough Partnership said: “The new campaign specifically targets drivers who think it is okay to have a couple of drinks before driving. Our advice to all drivers remains that any amount of alcohol affects your ability to drive.

“It’s not possible to say how much alcohol you can drink and stay below the limit. It depends on weight, age, sex, metabolism and, of course, what you’re drinking. The safest thing to do is to avoid all alcohol before driving. Drinking and driving risks a hefty fine, a minimum 12-month driving ban and a criminal record.”

For further information visit http://think.direct.gov.uk/