Anna’s Hope founder brings brain tumour charity to national stage at Pride of Britain awards

Anna's Hope founder Carole Hughes at the Pride of Britain final. EMN-140810-092944001

Anna's Hope founder Carole Hughes at the Pride of Britain final. EMN-140810-092944001

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Anna’s Hope founder Carole Hughes enjoyed a night of glitz and glamour at the final of the Daily Mirror’s Pride of Britain awards.

Carole, from Pilsgate, made it through to the national final on Monday after winning ITV Anglia’s regional fundraiser of the year. And although she didn’t win the overall award, she was delighted the charity she set up after daughter Anna died from a brain tumour was given national recognition.

“I had an amazing time,” said Carole. “Although I did not win the overall prize this was great recognition for Anna’s Hope, our volunteers and supporters and will raise lots of awareness for children with brain tumours.

“I could feel Anna squeezing my cheeks and saying ‘well done mummy’.”

The day after the event Carole was invited to 10 Downing Street to meet the Prime Minister. She said: “I was able to tell him about our latest work at Addenbrooke’s with Brainbow, the first children’s neuro-rehabilitation service in the UK.

“As I left I sprinkled number 10 with fairy dust and Mr Cameron kindly accepted two Fairy Anna badges for his daughters.”

Anna’s Hope was given a boost by staff and customers at The Boundary fish and chip shop in High Street, Market Deeping. The restaurant and takeaway raised £1,200 at its annual charity day by selling cod and chips and sausage and chips at a reduced price.

Half the money will go to Anna’s Hope while the other half will go to Bliss, a charity that supports premature babies and their families. Staff worked without pay for the day to support the good causes.