12 things you never knew about Peterborough’s lost tram network

Peterborough city centre with the hustle and bustle of trams
Peterborough city centre with the hustle and bustle of trams
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How best to deliver a public transport system is still a hot topic in most British cities.

One solution calls for a back to the future vision with the introduction of a modern version of trams.

A Peterborough tram driver and Conductor

A Peterborough tram driver and Conductor

Peterborough first got trams in 1903 and they ran for 27 years to 1930.

Today’s pictures show the trams during their heyday in various city locations including Long Causeway and Park Road.

Here are some Peterborough tram facts culled from our archives.

* The Peterborough trams came to a complete standstill during the General Strike of 1926. A temporary bus service ran in its place manned by volunteers.

A tram in Park Road, Peterborough. Seems a little strange a century on, from this picture of a tram trundling along park rd , cities across the country are bring them back as the transport of the future

A tram in Park Road, Peterborough. Seems a little strange a century on, from this picture of a tram trundling along park rd , cities across the country are bring them back as the transport of the future

* Trams ran from Cathedral Square, then known as Market Place, on New Road and Eastfield Road to Newark.

* Another branch took trams from Market Place along Dogsthorpe Road to Dogsthorpe and another ran from Market Place to the depot at Millfield and onto Walton.

* Fares ranged from 1d to 2d.

* There were 14 trams in operation throughout the period.

Long Causeway trams ENGEMN00120101220122516

Long Causeway trams ENGEMN00120101220122516

* The network cost about £48,000 to build, a lot of money at the time.

* Abandonment of the trams began on August 4, 1930, and from then until November when it was dismantled and replaced by buses, a single “ghost tram” ran along each route in turn from 6am until 7pm.

* The last ghost tram ran from the Market Place to the depot at 2.40pm on Saturday, November 15, 1930.

* The motorman, Mr E Jennings, had driven the first service on January 24, 1903

Electric trams took over from horse buses

Electric trams took over from horse buses

* The last ticket was purchased by Mr T Rowlands, who had been on the very first car.

* The last 1d ticket was bought by Inspector Jimmy Culshaw and is believed to still be in his family today.

* In the trams’ 27 years of service they carried 50 million passengers, travelled up to seven million miles, and took between £200,000 and £220,000 in revenue.

Peterborough's lost trams

Peterborough's lost trams